Webinar 02: Regenerative Farming through Group Adoption

Join Loddon Plains Landcare Network and guests for:

Webinar 02: Regenerative Farming through Group Adoption on Wednesday 3rd March from 11am until 1pm

as part of the LPLN’s Sustainable Agriculture, Sustainable Landscapes Series.

In this event, Jade, Natalie and Ross will talk through the processes to adopt and support community lead regenerative and sustainable farming practices.Register here: https://forms.gle/kyxVmTrMXB1o66Lr5

This series of events has been supported through the North Central CMA, the Victorian Landcare program and the LPLN Sustainable Agriculture program

Notice of LPLN Annual General Meeting

On behalf of the LPLN Committee of Management, LPLN invites members and supporters to its 2020 Loddon Plains Landcare Network AGM,

Friday 19th February, 2021 from 6.30pm at Serpentine Memorial Hall (Janiember Park).

RSVP’s can be sent by the 8th of February to the Secretary using the details below;
PO Box 197 Wedderburn Vic 3518 Ph: 0432 456 872 Email: correspondence.lpln@gmail.com

As is customary, presentations of activities by member groups is encouraged.

Expressions of Interest: CERT III AgCLM – Inglewood 2021

Hello Friends,

LPLN is entering into an exciting prospect, putting a call out to potential students interested in a Certificate III in Ag Conservation and Land Management in Inglewood this year.

This course, based in Inglewood, will deliver a Certificate III in Agriculture with emphasis placed on Sustainable Agriculture and biodiversity outcomes (CLM and natural resource management).

Classes will be delivered online, in person at Inglewood and on properties across the Loddon Plains. 
The course will also put a focus on getting students local on-ground experience on farms and public land visits across the LPLN region.

If you are interested in expressing your interest in this course please fill in the form HERE

Any enquiries can be directed to Danny Pettingill on 0490 412 430 or facilitator@lpln.org

New LPLN Sustainable Agriculture Facebook group

Got an interest in Sustainable and Regenerative Agriculture? LPLN’s Sustainable Agriculture Group is the first step in the Network’s Sustainable Agriculture Strategy.

Loddon Plains Landcare Network is committed to the development and awareness of sustainable and regenerative agriculture for improved enterprise and landscape function across the Loddon Plains.

This group serves as a forum for the Loddon Plains farming community to share experience, methods, ideas and stories in their journeys towards more sustainable farming practices.

Get over, answer some questions and join the conversation!

https://www.facebook.com/groups/lplnag/

Webinar: Ecological significance of the Kerang Ramsar wetland complex

Join us on the 29th of June from 7pm for a second webinar with recognised wetland ecologist Damien Cook talking about the ecology of the Kerang Ramsar wetland complex.

Damien is the Co-director and Senior Ecologist at Rakali Ecological Consulting and a leading expert in wetland, riparian and terrestrial ecology, particularly in the factors affecting the establishment and management of aquatic and wetland plants, and also the revegetation of terrestrial ecosystems.

Building on LPLN’s Birds of the Kerang Wetlands webinar, in this event Damien will share his knowledge about the ecological communities that call the Ramsar protected Kerang wetland complex home.

CLICK HERE to register, participants will be emailed a link to the event closer to the date.

LPLN REGENERATIVE READS 9 – Wednesday 29th April

The Biggest Estate on Earth, by Bill Gammage

Moving on and complimenting Regenerative Read 8, Dark Emu, Bill Gammage’s The Biggest Estate on Earth is heavily referenced by Bruce Pascoe.

This book paints a very different picture of the Australian landscape, one that had been meticulously managed through fire and millennia of Indigenous knowledge in land management. with an emphasis on how sophisticated, interconnected and even intra-continental Aboriginal land management was to culture and country.

The book has a great section with colour plates in which it compares landscapes and outlines the different bands of growth – pointing out new scrub-like growth and pioneer establishment where fire once managed the landscapes.

Other sections are filled with early encounters with the Australian landscape that appear to be very different to what we now see as ‘pristine bush’ as well as a number of detailed land management techniques employed by Indigenous cultures across the continent.

This is another read that is pretty dense to get through but a great resource for anyone with an interest in fire management and landscape regeneration

Click here to Bill talking about The Biggest Estate on Earth in 2015 as part of the Lunchbox / Soapbox series presented by The Wheeler Centre for Books, Writing and Ideas.

For the next little while LPLN Facilitator, Danny, will be featuring resources aimed to inspire.
Stay tuned every here or on the facebook page Wednesday and Friday for another resource off the shelf.

LPLN REGENERATIVE READS 8 – Friday 24th April

Dark Emu, by Bruce Pascoe

A wonderfully thought-provoking journey into indigenous farming and social structure based around the existence of agriculture, farming and social village-style living in pre-1788 Indigenous Australian culture.

In Dark Emu, Bruce Pascoe challenges the fundamental conception that Australia’s Traditional Owners lived solely as hunter-gatherers and instead produces a compelling argument that Indigenous Australia was one of social structure, village-type living and had established agriculture and food systems that linked Indigenous communities the length and breadth of the country.

Pascoe produces evidence-based arguments that Indigenous Australians built houses, sustainably farmed, harvested, preserved and saved cereals, grains, and seeds – even baking cakes and bread, built complex systems in fresh and salt water aquaculture and systematically farmed terrestrial fauna such as kangaroos using stone battues, systematic hunting and harvesting and fire management for feed and mustering.

This book brings together a vast range of evidence from archeological history, accounts from pioneer and explorer journals and spoken indigenous history to paint a very different picture of pre-1788 Australia.

This one is a real must-read.

For the next little while LPLN Facilitator, Danny, will be featuring resources aimed to inspire.
Stay tuned every here or on the facebook page Wednesday and Friday for another resource off the shelf.

LPLN REGENERATIVE READS 7 – Wednesday 22nd April

Australian Native Plants, by John Wrigley & Murray Fagg

A great book to have on hand for designing, managing and maintaining a native plant garden or selecting plants for particular areas and landscapes.

Breaking down into different types of environments i.e rockeries, groundcovers, shrubs and trees. This book contains really good information for plant selection, giving details on climate zones and soil conditions that individuals will survive in.

I use this all the time as an extension of the Bendigo Indigenous Plants guide along with others and often go to it when planning another section of our property.

It also contains good, clear sections on propagation, pruning, maintenance of a native garden for those that prefer a more curated look.

For the next little while LPLN Facilitator, Danny, will be featuring resources aimed to inspire.
Stay tuned every here or on the facebook page Wednesday and Friday for another resource off the shelf.

LPLN REGENERATIVE READS 6 – Friday 17th April

Indigenous Plants of Bendigo, A gardeners guide to growing and protecting local plants

Though this is focused on Bendigo and not the Loddon Plains, this guide is a ripper in the garden or in the field.

It has great information for identifying and growing different species, and the thing I love about it is that it is built in such a way that someone can go for a walk in the bush, find a species they might like to try on their property or in the garden and be able to look it up in this book for details on where it grows, what conditions it prefers and other details.

For the next little while LPLN Facilitator, Danny, will be featuring resources aimed to inspire.
Stay tuned every here or on the facebook page Wednesday and Friday for another resource off the shelf.

LPLN REGENERATIVE READS 5, Wednesday 15th April

Bringing Back the Bush, by Joan Bradley

“Bringing back the bush is a gentle art, demanding a strong will and patience”

Joan Bradley

A quote from the introduction of this book that I often keep in mind.
This is a classic resource for revegetation projects and has provided the basis for many resources and publications.

Joan and Eileen Bradley with their ‘Bradley Method’ have provided 3 key principles in bush regeneration still followed today;

  1. Identify and work the best areas first
  2. Keep disturbance to a minimum, and
  3. Let regeneration of natives dictate the rate of weed removal

With a great account of their humble beginnings and their journey into respecting the natural order of natives and the role they could play in the management of weed-infested areas.

This guide is really all about weed management and removal, Joan Bradley provides detailed information about the sisters’ methods, providing sound advice on the removal of different weed and plant types and also examples and case studies of different landscapes. This is a great one to revisit.

For the next little while LPLN Facilitator, Danny, will be featuring resources aimed to inspire.
Stay tuned every here or on the facebook page Wednesday and Friday for another resource off the shelf.

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