LPLN REGENERATIVE READS 9 – Wednesday 29th April

The Biggest Estate on Earth, by Bill Gammage

Moving on and complimenting Regenerative Read 8, Dark Emu, Bill Gammage’s The Biggest Estate on Earth is heavily referenced by Bruce Pascoe.

This book paints a very different picture of the Australian landscape, one that had been meticulously managed through fire and millennia of Indigenous knowledge in land management. with an emphasis on how sophisticated, interconnected and even intra-continental Aboriginal land management was to culture and country.

The book has a great section with colour plates in which it compares landscapes and outlines the different bands of growth – pointing out new scrub-like growth and pioneer establishment where fire once managed the landscapes.

Other sections are filled with early encounters with the Australian landscape that appear to be very different to what we now see as ‘pristine bush’ as well as a number of detailed land management techniques employed by Indigenous cultures across the continent.

This is another read that is pretty dense to get through but a great resource for anyone with an interest in fire management and landscape regeneration

Click here to Bill talking about The Biggest Estate on Earth in 2015 as part of the Lunchbox / Soapbox series presented by The Wheeler Centre for Books, Writing and Ideas.

For the next little while LPLN Facilitator, Danny, will be featuring resources aimed to inspire.
Stay tuned every here or on the facebook page Wednesday and Friday for another resource off the shelf.

LPLN REGENERATIVE READS 8 – Friday 24th April

Dark Emu, by Bruce Pascoe

A wonderfully thought-provoking journey into indigenous farming and social structure based around the existence of agriculture, farming and social village-style living in pre-1788 Indigenous Australian culture.

In Dark Emu, Bruce Pascoe challenges the fundamental conception that Australia’s Traditional Owners lived solely as hunter-gatherers and instead produces a compelling argument that Indigenous Australia was one of social structure, village-type living and had established agriculture and food systems that linked Indigenous communities the length and breadth of the country.

Pascoe produces evidence-based arguments that Indigenous Australians built houses, sustainably farmed, harvested, preserved and saved cereals, grains, and seeds – even baking cakes and bread, built complex systems in fresh and salt water aquaculture and systematically farmed terrestrial fauna such as kangaroos using stone battues, systematic hunting and harvesting and fire management for feed and mustering.

This book brings together a vast range of evidence from archeological history, accounts from pioneer and explorer journals and spoken indigenous history to paint a very different picture of pre-1788 Australia.

This one is a real must-read.

For the next little while LPLN Facilitator, Danny, will be featuring resources aimed to inspire.
Stay tuned every here or on the facebook page Wednesday and Friday for another resource off the shelf.

LPLN REGENERATIVE READS 7 – Wednesday 22nd April

Australian Native Plants, by John Wrigley & Murray Fagg

A great book to have on hand for designing, managing and maintaining a native plant garden or selecting plants for particular areas and landscapes.

Breaking down into different types of environments i.e rockeries, groundcovers, shrubs and trees. This book contains really good information for plant selection, giving details on climate zones and soil conditions that individuals will survive in.

I use this all the time as an extension of the Bendigo Indigenous Plants guide along with others and often go to it when planning another section of our property.

It also contains good, clear sections on propagation, pruning, maintenance of a native garden for those that prefer a more curated look.

For the next little while LPLN Facilitator, Danny, will be featuring resources aimed to inspire.
Stay tuned every here or on the facebook page Wednesday and Friday for another resource off the shelf.

LPLN REGENERATIVE READS 6 – Friday 17th April

Indigenous Plants of Bendigo, A gardeners guide to growing and protecting local plants

Though this is focused on Bendigo and not the Loddon Plains, this guide is a ripper in the garden or in the field.

It has great information for identifying and growing different species, and the thing I love about it is that it is built in such a way that someone can go for a walk in the bush, find a species they might like to try on their property or in the garden and be able to look it up in this book for details on where it grows, what conditions it prefers and other details.

For the next little while LPLN Facilitator, Danny, will be featuring resources aimed to inspire.
Stay tuned every here or on the facebook page Wednesday and Friday for another resource off the shelf.

LPLN REGENERATIVE READS 5, Wednesday 15th April

Bringing Back the Bush, by Joan Bradley

“Bringing back the bush is a gentle art, demanding a strong will and patience”

Joan Bradley

A quote from the introduction of this book that I often keep in mind.
This is a classic resource for revegetation projects and has provided the basis for many resources and publications.

Joan and Eileen Bradley with their ‘Bradley Method’ have provided 3 key principles in bush regeneration still followed today;

  1. Identify and work the best areas first
  2. Keep disturbance to a minimum, and
  3. Let regeneration of natives dictate the rate of weed removal

With a great account of their humble beginnings and their journey into respecting the natural order of natives and the role they could play in the management of weed-infested areas.

This guide is really all about weed management and removal, Joan Bradley provides detailed information about the sisters’ methods, providing sound advice on the removal of different weed and plant types and also examples and case studies of different landscapes. This is a great one to revisit.

For the next little while LPLN Facilitator, Danny, will be featuring resources aimed to inspire.
Stay tuned every here or on the facebook page Wednesday and Friday for another resource off the shelf.

LPLN REGENERATIVE READS 4 – Friday 10th April

Pollinators, Birds, Wildflowers and Frogs & Reptiles pocket guides

With the Autumn Backyard Bird count underway and Karen Retra’s Wild Pollinator Count happening next week from the 12th to the 19th of April, it’s a great time to feature these guides.

Featuring most commonly found species, these guides are a great resource for identifying different birds and invertebrates on the farm, in the bush or in the backyard. Great for beginners or those with an interest in what might be around them.

I’m rarely without the pollinator or birds guides – though this might be a little biased given my interests!

Find more information about the programs and how you can participate in these surveys by clicking through to these links:
https://wildpollinatorcount.com/
http://www.birdsinbackyards.net

And for some easy to use survey guides and resources you can use these:
https://www.ppwcma.vic.gov.au/…/Victorian-Pollinators-1-pag…
http://www.birdlife.org.au/…/WL_-_Woodland_ID_booklet_v7_we…

For the next little while LPLN Facilitator, Danny, will be featuring resources aimed to inspire.
Stay tuned every here or on the facebook page Wednesday and Friday for another resource off the shelf.

LPLN REGENERATIVE READS 3 – Wednesday 8th April

In the Blink of an Eye and Seven Deadly Colours, by Dr. Andrew Parker

These two books are 100% brain-breaking, and impossible to put down once you get going!

I was introduced to Dr. Andrew Parker by a work colleague whilst still working in lighting design. The theories in these books, particularly In the Blink of an Eye went on to inform my design practices and the way I designed with light but also clearly got my attention on a biology and evolution level and I credit it as one of the major influences in bringing me to the environment industry.

In the Blink of an Eye lays out an argument that an evolutionary explosion occurred during the Cambrian period due to the quick evolution of the eye, from primitive light sensors to an acute weapon in the arsenal of different species. This theory leads on to suggest fast-paced species adaptation in armour, speed, agility and other senses and behaviors to combat predatory species and the early forms of the camera eyes of today.

Seven Deadly Colours provides an extension of the theory into colour evolution and the vital role it plays in the natural world including how it misleads, adapts and reacts to specific environments.

There is so much material in these books that I simply can’t pick out favourite sections, even now. Though I will make mention of the completely engrossing sections on trilobites, early evolution in the oceans, sedimentary rock formations, and the fascinating use of colour in Cuttlefish and its vital role in evading predators and other threats.

Even now, I get something different out of these books to the point of when going back to reference material I end up reading vast sections again!

Two great reads if you are up for a couple of brain-breakers.

For the next little while LPLN Facilitator, Danny, will be featuring resources aimed to inspire.
Stay tuned every here or on the facebook page Wednesday and Friday for another resource off the shelf.

LPLN REGENERATIVE READS Friday 3rd April

Call of the Reed Warbler, by Charles Massy

What a book.

Massy includes here some serious firepower in the regenerative agriculture sphere with sections devoted to Walter Jehne, Richard and Jenny Weatherly, Colin Seis, Tim Wright, Ian and Dianne Haggerty and Rudolph Steiner (and that’s only a few!) with clear inspiration right through the book of Aldo Leopold and Allan Savory.

This tome, though dense, long and brain-breaking, puts into context the correlations between significant biodiversity assets and productive farming.

Call of the Reed Warbler shifts the dynamic in understanding landscape function and champions on-farm biodiversity and low impact farming.
My copy is worn, tattered, underlined and scrawled over and just about falling apart from being flicked and thumbed.

It will take a bit of time to get through, but a great read to understand and taste different perspectives and methods of regenerative farming practices.

Favorite sections include “Farming Without Farming”, “Keep a Green Bough in Your Heart” and a wonderful account of discovering the importance of a thorny Hymenthera dentata in a functioning landscape and ecosystem.

For the next little while LPLN Facilitator, Danny, will be featuring resources aimed to inspire.
Stay tuned every here or on the facebook page Wednesday and Friday for another resource off the shelf.

LPLN REGENERATIVE READS Wednesday 1st April

Todays read, Native Trees and Shrubs of South Eastern Victoria & Trees of Vic. and Adjoining Areas, by Leon Costermans.
The master guide book/s, these are my go-to for most ID’s and project design.

The large guide is well-thumbed on the desk and provides a great expanded guide for ID’s, revegetation planning and putting together plant communities in different regions. Whilst the Trees guide is a perfect size for a field bag and can be whipped out of the bag or a pocket quickly to get an ID in the field, my copy is full of different leaves!

A must-have resource.

For the next little while LPLN Facilitator, Danny, will be featuring resources aimed to inspire.
Stay tuned every here or on the facebook page Wednesday and Friday for another tidbit off the shelf.

LPLN REGENERATIVE READS

For the next little while LPLN Facilitator, Danny, will be featuring resources aimed to inspire, mostly reads but there will be other gems in there too!

Stay tuned to the LPLN Facebook Page every Wednesday and Friday for another ripper off the shelf.
For the warm-up, here is a discussion produced by ABC Radio National for its Big Ideas Podcast, Climate Crisis – Saving landscapes? features the wonderfully honest and insightful Barry Traill along with James Schultz and Andrew Macintosh.

This discussion gave a great lens to put large scale land management, farming and carbon capture into perspective.

Above link not working? Try this one;

https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/climate-crisis-%E2%80%93-saving-landscapes/9543336?

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